tomato peach salsatomato peach salsa on crisp bread

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:


tomato peach salsa on crisp bread



Ingredients:
40 gms Chopped ripe tomato (deseed)  
20 Gms Chopped onions
5gms Chopped green chili
10 gms Chopped peach
10 gms Chopped coriander
Minced garlic clove
Salt to taste
Cumin powder twice a pinch
Chili powder to taste
Bread slice

Method:

Cut the bread slice as your desire.
Toast/ grill the sliced bread till golden brown and crisp with little oil.
Mix all the ingredients and top up to bread slice.
Garnish with peach and serve.

mistake while cooking

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:

  Don’t read the entire recipe before you start cooking.
      Result: Flavors are dull, entire steps or ingredients get left out.

 Don’t taste as you go.
      Result: The flavors or textures of an otherwise excellent dish are out of balance or unappealing.

 Boil when you should simmer.
     Result: A hurried-up dish that’s cloudy, tough, or dry.

 Pop meat straight from the fridge into the oven or onto the grill.
     Result: Food cooks unevenly: The outside is overdone, the inside rare or raw.

 Put all the salt in the marinade or breading.
     Result: Fish, poultry, or meat that’s underseasoned.

 Don’t shock vegetables when they’ve reached the desired texture.
      Result: Mush.

 Neglect the nuts you’re toasting.
     Result: Burned nuts, with a sharp, bitter flavor.

 Try to rush the cooking of caramelized onions.
     Result: You end up with sautéed onions, which are nice but a far cry from the melt-in-your-mouth caramelized ideal.

Meat gets no chance to rest after cooking.
      Result: Delicious juices vacate the meat and run all over the cutting board, leaving steak or roast dry.

 Don’t use a meat thermometer.
     Result: Your roast chicken, leg of lamb, or beef tenderloin turns out over- or undercooked.

 Don’t get the pan hot enough before you add the food.
     Result: Food that sticks, scallops with no sear, pale meats.

 Turn the food too often.
      Result: You interfere with the sear, food sticks, or you lose the breading.

 Too casual about measuring ingredients.
      Result: Dry, tough cakes, rubbery brownies and a host of other textural mishaps.

 Don’t know your oven’s quirks and idiosyncrasies.
     Result: Food cooks too fast, too slow, or unevenly.

 Overheat chocolate.
     Result: Instead of having a smooth, creamy, luxurious consistency, your chocolate is grainy, separated, or scorched.

 Make unwise substitutions in baking.
     Result: You wreck the underlying chemistry of the dish.

Underbake cakes and breads.
     Result: Cakes, brownies, and breads turn out pallid and gummy.
 

84 banjan foods of nepal...

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
84 banjan food of nepal
copied from vintage pictures'/Nepal

mixed aachar (carrot,radish and cucumber)

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
ingredients:
mixed achar
20 gm cucumber
20gms carrot
15 gms radish
5 gm small green peas
15 gm boiled roughly dice potato
10 gm cauliflower florrets (option)
5 gm fenugreek seed
salt to taste
5 gm hing (asofetida)
1 tbs amchoor (mango powder)
2 tbs chilli powder
1/2 tbs turmeric powder
2 tbs oil
coriander leaves for garnish

methods:
 grate the radish and cut the carrot, susumber and cauliflower in 1/2 inch thick Julienne.
mis all the ingresient in a bowl except fenugreek seed, turmeric and oil.
shake well all the indregients.
heat the oil anf add fenugreek seed in oil till black in color.
add turmeric powder in hot oil and pour in the mixed ingredient immediately .
and garnish with coriander

serves 2

ABOUT HERBS (know about the herbs used in kitchen)

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:


Angelica is an herb that has several uses. The leaves are frequently added when cooking red currants, rhubarb, gooseberries and red plums to help reduce the acidity and sweeten these often sour fruits.
angelica
Its strong, clean flavor makes angelica stems an excellent candidate for crystallization. Its seeds are sometimes used in pastry. The stems are usually crystallized and used as a decorative pastry garnish. The leaves and stems impart a celery flavor if added to sauces, and vegetable dishes.Long ago, Angelica was burned as incense to perfume the house. The herb takes its name from the story that an angel came to earth when plague was rampant and told people to hold a piece of Angelica root in their mouths to ward off pestilence.The root of Angelica can be used for making tea. A syrup made from the stems and leaves can be stored and diluted to use as a drink and tea made from the dried leaves is said to be good for soothing the nerves, tension, colds coughs and rheumatism. 

arugula
Arugula is technically known as a salad green or salad herb. Add to lettuce, tomatoes and any other mixed baby salad greens, and create new and exciting taste sensations.Arugula is very very low in calories and is also high in vitamins A and C.Arugula is also known as rocket, roquette, rugula and rucola, and is very popular in Italian cuisine.Rinse the leaves in cool water and dry on paper toweling. Store in zip lock bag. Best if used within two days.Its leaves have a unique, peppery sweet tang, adding pizzazz even to the blandest salads. Although arugula provides a flavor impact, it does not have an aftertaste.

basil
Basil: One of the most populary culinary herbs is sweet basil. The best flavor of purple basil comes from the Red Rubin variety. Especially good in Thai dishes is the Thai Basil whose leaves have a spicy aniseed aroma with hints of mint and citrus. All can be found at most seed and plant nurseries. If you are unfamiliar with the nuances of different basils, your best bet is to start with the sweet basil (most often used in Pesto). Basil is available in fresh leaves and in dried leaves, which are also sometimes called rubbed. Fresh leaves may be stored in a cool place or in the refrigerator for a very short time. The strong, clove like flavor is essential to many Italian recipes and it is paired most often with tomatoes. Basil is primarily used in sauces, pizzas, salads and pasta dishes. It is also the main ingredient used in pesto.

bayleaf
Bayleaf : Also know as sweet bay, sweet laurel, bay laurel and laurel leaf. Store in a cool, dry place, away from bright light, heat and moisture. Available fresh, dried whole leaves or ground dried leaves. Bay is probably the one herb that most cooks prefer using dried than fresh.Add a bay leaf or two to marinades, stock, pâtés, stews, stuffings and curries. When poaching fish, add a bay leaf to the water. Store with rice in a tight fitting jar and the leaf will impart its flavor to the rice when cooked.Bay leaves greatly improve flavor if you are cutting down on salt. Try adding a bay leaf or two when you boil potatoes to replace salt. Always remember to remove the whole bay leaf after cooking in any dish.Fragrant bay leaves are a basic ingredient of bouquet garni, but they have other wonderful uses. Bay leaves may be added to many fish dishes, particularly salmon, custards, stews, rice dishes and especially soups. 

bergamot

Bergamot : The flowers make an attractive garnish and can be crystallized. It is said a western species,
M. menthaefolia, can be used like oregano and the spicy flowers can be added to chili and salsa.
A Spanish botanist, Bergamot oil, which is used in authentic Earl Grey tea, is extracted from this plant.
The flowers maybe scattered in salads and the leaves infused by simmering for 10 minutes in an enamel saucepan for greater flavor. Put fresh leaf into China tea for an Earl Grey flavor, into wine cups and into lemonade. Add sparingly to salads, stuffings, pork. Use for jams, jellies and bergamot milk; pour 1 cup boiling milk over 1 tablespoon dried or 3 tablespoons shredded leaves, steep for 5 - 7 minutes, strain and serve.
borage
Borage is a culinary herb mostly popular in Central Europe. Its light cucumber fragrance is usually suitable for salads prepared from raw vegetables. Sometimes borage is used to make pureed soups.
Borage is a favorite herb for flavoring summer drinks, usually fruit and wine cups. The blue and occasionally pink delicate flowers are edible. The leaves can be eaten in salads and the flowers added as decoration.
The blooms can also be candied. Watch out for the thorny like leaves. Tender leaves and star-shaped flowers have a very mild cucumber flavor. The plant grows wild in Central and Eastern Europe.
Boiling, frying and simmering will quickly destroy most of its characteristic fragrance.
Young flowers of borage can be pink and become blue only in the course of their individual flowering period.


caraway
 Caraway can be both an herb as well as a spice. The aromatic seeds come from a plant in the parsley family.The caraway plant, native to Asia, produces this sickle shaped seed that gives rye bread its distinctive flavor. The spice is used in beef stews, pork dishes, soups, candies, and baked goods, especially bread.
The caraway plant grows up to 2 feet in height with feathery leaves and cream white flowers. It is the leaves of this plant that can be used in cooking or salads. Their taste is very fresh with a sweet undertone much like parsley. The leaves should be cut during the growing season. Caraway seeds may also enhance the flavor of many vegetables. They are good tossed with boiled and quartered new potatoes, cabbage or in sauerkraut. Caraway seed is also known as a mild digestive aid.

chervil
Chervil: Also known as Gourmet Parsley and Garden Chervil. Can be used as fresh leaves or dried. Store dried leaves in a cool, dry, dark place away from heat light and moisture. Dried chervil will keep for 6 months.Chervil is a delicate herb with subtle taste. It has a slightly anise-like flavor that can be quickly lost in cooking. Garnish salads with it, but serve it at the last moment. Chervil is a very popular herb in France.
It is one of the classic ingredients in the traditional French herb blend, Fines Herbes and is very popular in French cuisine. It has a delicate flavor and is suitable wherever parsley is used. Chop the leaf into soups, omelettes (fish and egg dishes in the last ten to twelve minutes of cooking so its flavor is not cooked away), salads, dressings and add to chicken before roasting.Chervil is better used as a fresh herb because during a cooking process a lot of its anise - like aroma and parsley taste is lost.Chervil is extremely delicate but may be preserved in vinegar and oil.
chives
Chives are a mild member herb of the onion family. Chives has many uses and can be added to potato salad, baked potatoes, soups, salads, omelets, dips and spreads, pastas and sauces.
Use it anywhere you want to add onion flavor without the harsh pungency of onion. Best if used fresh. The flavor is lost in drying. Add fresh or dried chives at the end of cooking to preserve the flavor. However, once you taste fresh chives, you will know there is no comparison of flavor. Soon, you will probably want a fresh pot of chives on your windowsill, even if you have nothing else in your herb garden.
Chopped chives lift many foods above the ordinary. Sprink them on soups, salads, chicken, potatoes, cooked vegetables and egg dishes. Blend chopped chives with butter or cream cheese , yogurt sauces and baked potatoes. Add toward the end of cooking or as a garnish.

coriander
Coriander also known as cilantro or dhania, is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Coriander is native to southern Europe and North Africa to southwestern Asia.The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, Chinese parsley, or cilantro (particularly in America).The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with citrus overtones.The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many South Asian foods (such as chutneys and salads), in Chinese dishes, in Mexican cooking, particularly in salsa and guacamole and as a garnish,oriander, like many spices, contains antioxidants, which can delay or prevent the spoilage of food seasoned with this spice. A study found both the leaves and seed to contain antioxidants, but the leaves were found to have a stronger effectCoriander has been documented as a traditional treatment for diabetes.
 
Dill is available in weed and seed, both fresh and dried. Store dried seeds and leaves in a cool, dry, dark place away from heat, light and moisture. Leaves will keep for six months. Seeds will keep indefinitely.
dill
Dill or dill weed is an herb that produces clusters of small flowers from which dill seed is gathered and dill weed is obtained from the thin, feathery leaves. The light aroma of dill faintly resembles licorice.
Dill weed is good in soups, omelets, seafood dishes, herring, salmon, potato salads, and steamed vegetables. Dill seed is used in breads, pickling, cabbage dishes, stews, rice and cooked root vegetables.
Dill has a totally unique spicy green taste. Add whole seeds to potato salad, pickles, bean soups and salmon dishes. Ground seed can flavor herb butter, mayonnaise and mustard. The leaves go well with fish, cream cheese and cucumber.

fennel
Fennel yields an herb and a spice. The stems and leaves are all edible. The spice comes from the dried seeds, the herb comes from the leaves and the stalk and root are the vegetable.
Fennel is native to the Mediterranean and is one of our oldest cultivated plants. Roman warriors took fennel to keep in good health while their ladies ate it to prevent obesity.
fennel seed
The seed is similar to anise seed, but sweeter and milder. It pairs well with fish, but Italians also like to add it to sauces, meats & sausages. If you are familiar with the taste, it is probably from having it in commercially prepared sausages. Add the seeds to sauces, breads, savory crackers and water for poaching fish.
Stuff the leaves into oily fish like mackerel and sprinkle finely chopped stems and leaves on salads and cooked vegetables and can also be added to soups and stuffings. 


fenugreek
Fenugreek is cultivated worldwide as a semi-arid crop.The seeds are used as a spice in curries, pickles and chutneys. The raw seeds are bitter so they are usually roasted gently to develop flavor before grinding (do not overheat as that will turn it red and bitter to the taste). The seeds are very hard, and difficult to grind, a mortar and pestle working best.Seed extract is used in imitation vanilla, butterscotch and rum flavorings, and is the main flavoring in imitation maple syrup. Fenugreek seeds are also used in candy, baked goods, ice cream, chewing gum and soft drinks. The seeds can be roasted and used as a coffee substitute.
The seeds may also be spouted and used as a winter salad herb. (Ready in 4 to 6 days) As the sprouts grow, the curry flavor recedes.The young leaves are a salad herb and can added to other salad greens like watercress for a delicious salad. Fresh or dried leaves are used to flavor other dishes. The dried leaves (called kasuri methi) have a bitter taste and a strong characteristic smell.



Hoja santa is an aromatic herb with a heart-shaped, velvety leaf which grows in tropic Mesoamerica. The name hoja santa means "sacred leaf" in Spanish. It is also known as yerba santa, hierba santa, Mexican pepperleaf, root beer plant, and sacred pepper.
hugo santa
The leaves can reach up to 30 centimeters (12 inches) or more in size. The complex flavor of hoja santa is not so easily described; it has been compared to eucalyptus, licorice, sassafras, anise, nutmeg, mint, tarragon, and black pepper. The flavor is stronger in the young stems and veins.
It is often used in Mexican cuisine for tamales, the fish or meat wrapped in fragrant leaves for cooking, and as an essential ingredient in Mole Verde, the green sauce originated in the Oaxaca region of Mexico. It is also chopped to flavor soups and eggs. In Central Mexico, it is used to flavor chocolate drinks. In southeastern Mexico, a green liquor called Verdín is made from hoja santa. While typically used fresh, it is also used in dried form, although drying removes much of the flavor and makes the leaf too brittle to be used as a wrapper.

hops
Hops are the flowers used to season beer. Bittering hops, meaning adding hops early on in the boil process, provide bitterness to the beer to balance the sweetness of the malt. Hops added at the end of the boil, referred to as finishing hops, add flavor and aroma to the beer. Adding hops directly to the fermenter, or dry hopping, lends additional hop aroma to the beer.
Hops also serve as a natural preservative, helping to prevent spoilage in beer. Hops comes as either whole flowers or compressed pellets (think rabbit food). There are many varieties of hops available to homebrewers, allowing for great diversity of flavors and aromas.
Different hops are used to brew different styles of beer. For example, cascade hops give American pale ales their distinct citrusy quality, fuggles have an earthiness common in English-style ales, and saaz lend the spicy/herbal character found in European Pilsners. 

Lemongrass is a tall perennial grass. Common names include lemon grass, lemongrass, barbed wire grass, silky heads, citronella grass, fever grass or Hieba Luisa amongst many others.
lemongrass
Lemongrass is widely used as a herb in Asian (particularly Vietnamese, Hmong, Khmer, Thai, Lao, Malaysian, Indonesian, Philippine, Sri Lankan) and Caribbean cooking. It has a citrus flavor and can be dried and powdered, or used fresh.For soups and simmered dishes, cut the trimmed stalk at a very sharp angle into inch-long pieces, exposing its fragrant interior. Smash with the flat blade of a cleaver or heavy knife to bruise and release the aromatic oils before adding to these dishes.
For salads, cut with a sharp knife into very thin rounds, breaking up the fibers that run the length of the stalk. When slicing, if the outer layer seems fibrous, peel it off before proceeding. Such thinly sliced rounds of the inner stalk can be easily chewed with other salad ingredients for a refreshing burst of lemony herb flavor.
For curries, cut the stalk into thin rounds before pounding in a stone mortar to reduce to paste. Although lemon grass appears dry when you are slicing it, when crushed, you will see that it really is quite moist. Crushing breaks the juice sacs in the fibers and releases the aromatic oils that make lemon grass so special. 


marjoram
Marjoram is an herb that has a mild, sweet flavor similar to oregano ( it is closely related and of the same family - Origanum) with perhaps a hint of balsam. It is said to be “the meat herb" but it compliments all foods except sweets.While fresh marjoram is excellent with salads and mild flavored foods, it has the best taste and greatest pungency when they are dried. Marjoram has a slightly more delicate flavor than Oregano.
Marjoram because it is more delicate should be added toward the end of cooking so its flavor is not lost. Marjoram goes well with pork and veal and complements stuffing for poultry, dumplings and herb scones or breads.

mint
Mint is an herb that comes in many varieties such as peppermint, spearmint, apple mint, lemon mint and even chocolate mint. Mint came to the New World with colonists, who used it in tea for medicinal purposes.
Mint is used for seasoning lamb, vegetable such as carrots, bell pepper, and tomatoes, in yogurt dressings, and breads. It is also used in the Middle East for salads, tabouli and marinated vegetables.
Mint is good in soups, salads, sauces, plain meat, fish and poultry, stews, sweet or savory recipes, extremely good with chocolate or lemon based desserts. Add near the end of cooking for a better flavor.


mitsuba
Mitsuba is also known as Japanese parsley, Japanese Chervil, Japanese wild parsley or honeywort. Mitsuba - a delightful Japanese herb with a clean fresh flavor reminiscent of angelica, celery and parsley.
Leaves, root and stems are used raw or cooked, seedlings and young leaves added to salads. The seed is used for seasoning and the stem can be blanched and used as a celery substitute. The cress-like young seedlings are used in salads and the stems and leaves are chopped and used to flavor a number of dishes.
The leaves which are dark green look a little like oversized flat leaf parsley.


Oregano is an herb that derives its name from two Greek words meaning "the joy of the mountain". It is a hardy member of the mint family that has been used for flavoring fish, meat and sauces since ancient times.
oregano
Oregano goes well with vegetables, roast beef, lamb, chicken and pork. Marjoram goes well with all pork and veal and complements stuffing for poultry, dumplings and herb scones or breads.Generally used to season Mexican, Italian, Greek and Spanish dishes. Oregano has a warm, aromatic scent and robust taste. It's uses include seasoning soups, stews, meat pies, pasta sauces and shellfish.






parsley
 Parsley is a great all around herb. It quickly adds a touch of color and texture to any recipe. The aroma and taste of parsley is very distinctive for a herb that is generally described as being mild and non obtrusive.
Use fresh or dried parsley in any recipe. Especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes as well as sauces to go with fish, poultry, veal and pork. Use fresh leaves as garnish.Parsley has a delicate favor that combines well with other herbs like basil, bay leaves, chives, dill weed, garlic, marjoram, mint, oregano and thyme.Flat leaf or Italian is used primarily in cooking because of its more robust flavor and curly parsley is used primaryily for garnish. Add at the end of cooking for better flavor.


rosemarry
Rosemary is an herb of the mint family. It is a small evergreen shrub that is native to the Mediterranean and likes warm climates, but will flourish in nearly any climate. It is produced all over the world.
Rosemary's aromatic flavor blends well with garlic and thyme to season lamb roasts, meat stews, and marinades. Rosemary also enlivens lighter fish and poultry dishes, tomato sauces, and vegetables.
Dress fresh steamed red potatoes and peas or a stir fried mixture of zucchini and summer squash. Rosemary has a tea like aroma and a piney flavor. Crush leaves by hand or with a mortar and pestle before using. 


sage
Sage is an herb from an evergreen shrub in the mint family. Fresh sage sprigs have long, narrow grayish green leaves and, although it is a member of the mint family, it has a musty yet smoky aroma.
Sage enhances pork, lamb, meats, and sausages. Chopped leaves flavor salads, pickles, and cheese. Crumble leaves for full fragrance. Use ground Sage sparingly as foods absorb its flavor more quickly.
Sage is a wonderful flavor enhancement for seafood, vegetables, stuffing, and savory breads. Rub sage, cracked pepper, and garlic into pork tenderloin or chops before cooking. 


savory
Savory is available in fresh or dried leaves. Tender leaves can be added fresh to salads or used as a garnish or bottle the herb in vinegar. Once dried and chopped, it is an integral part of herb mixtures like Herbes de Provence.There are two types of savory - winter and summer. The two look much the same, but winter is a bit more pungent. Savory smells and tastes like Mint and Rosemary chopped together.Savory is nicknamed the bean herb. It is typically used in soups, beans and as a meat and poultry seasoning. This herb tastes slightly warm and sharp. It is a very strong herb and should be used sparingly.Most commonly used as a seasoning for green vegetables, savory's special affinity is for beans. Use summer savory, with its more delicate flavor, for tender baby green beans, and winter savory to enhance a whole medley of dried beans and lentils.

stevia
Stevia is an herb from a semitropical perennial shrub of the daisy family, native to the mountains of Brazil and Paraguay. This plant packs so much sweetness into its leaves that they can be used in place of sugar.
One dried leaf, ground, is 10 to 15 times sweeter than an equal amount of sugar, and powdered extracts made from the leaves are up to 300 times as sweet, without the calories (make that no calories!). Plus it is a very attractive plant that pots well.Nonetheless, people can buy stevia powder and use it as a sugar replacement at home. One fresh stevia leaf is enough to sweeten a cup of tea, coffee or a glass of lemonade. The leaves can be added to barbecue sauce, salad dressings, soups, and stews.



tarragon





Tarragon is an exceptional herb. It has a subtle and sophisticated flavor and is an essential herb in French cuisine. It's flavor is delicate and almost licorice or anise-like. Tarragon is native to Siberia.
Tarragon, together with parsley, chervil, and chives make a traditional French blend, Fines Herbes. Tarragon is exceptional in egg dishes, poached fish, mushrooms and other vegetables.Tarragon is good with chicken and in salad dressings. It is often used in sauces like béarnaise and French cuisine. Tarragon is also often used to infuse vinegar and olive oils.

thyme


Thyme: Fresh garden thyme is an herb that has thin grayish green leaves and a subtle lemon, yet minty aroma and taste. Thyme is used in a wide variety of cuisine, but is most closely associated with French cuisine.It is often used in soups and sauces, with meat, poultry or fish. It is also a very important component of herbes de Provence and bouquet garni. Fresh thyme has the most flavor used whole, with the stem.
Thyme is included in seasoning blends for poultry and stuffing and also commonly used in fish sauces, chowders, and soups. It goes well with lamb and veal as well as in eggs and croquettes. Thyme if often paired with tomatoes.

























spicy chicken livers

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
ingredients:
spicy chicken livers
  • 115 gm plain flour
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp ground corriander
  • 1/1 tsp parprika powder
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg powder
  • 350 gm chicken liver
  • 6 tbsp oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • fresh mint to garnish

method:

  • sift the flour in a large bowl. add cumin, coriander, paprika and nutmeg and mix well with salt and pepper.
  • trim the chicken livers and dry eith kichen paper.
  • cut the liver in halves or quaters and toss in the seasoned flour shaking off any excess.
  • heat the oil and cook the liver in batches over high heat stirring frequently for 3-5 minutes, or until crisp on outside but tender inside.
  • serve hot garnishing by mint leaves.

BABA GANOUSH

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
Ingredients:
  • 1 large eggplant
  • 1/4 cup tahini, plus more as needed
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice, plus more as needed
  • 1 pinch ground cumin
  • salt to taste
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

Directions:

  • Prepare a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill. or Preheat an oven to 375°F.
  • Prick the eggplant with a fork in several places and place on the grill rack 4 to 5 inches from the fire.
  • Grill, turning frequently, until the skin blackens and blisters and the flesh just begins to feel soft, 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Transfer the eggplant to a baking sheet and bake until very soft, 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven, let cool slightly, and peel off and discard the skin.
  • Place the eggplant flesh in a bowl.
  • Using a fork, mash the eggplant to a paste.
  • Add the 1/4 cup tahini, the garlic, the 1/4 cup lemon juice and the cumin and mix well.
  • Season with salt, then taste and add more tahini and/or lemon juice, if needed.
  • Transfer the mixture to a serving bowl and spread with the back of a spoon to form a shallow well.
  • Drizzle the olive oil over the top and sprinkle with the parsley.
  • Serve at room temperature.

honeyed chicken wings

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
honeyed chicken wings
ingredients:
450 gm chicken wings
2 tbsp oil (peanut oil)
2 tbsp soya sauce
2 tbsp cleared honey
2 garlic cloves crushed
1 tbs sesame seed
 hoisin sauce (option)
for marination:
1 dried red chili flakes
1 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp ginger powder/ paste
finely grated rind of 1 lemon

methods:
to make the marinade, mix all the ingredients in  a bowl.
thoroughly rub all the mixture to chicken wings and set a side for 30 miinutes.
heat the oil in large frying wok.
add the chicken and fry , turning frequently for about 10-12 minutes until golden crisp. until cook
add soya sauce, honey, garlic ( hoisin sauce) and sesame seed to the wok and stir for few more minute and serve hot.

simple newari food

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:

mee kwa (curried fenugreek seed soup)

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
fenugreek seed soup
ingredients:
200 gm fenugreek seed (methi)
50 gm small green beans
salt to taste
oil 20 ml
5 cups water
1 tbs chili powder (as taste)
11/2 tbs corriander and cumin powder
5gm chopped onions
fenugreek leaves for garnish

methods:
soak fenugreek seed and beans over a night.
wash the fenugreek seed properly until bitter taste washed off. (may be 3-4 times)
take a pot and boil the water.
put all the ingredients and boil till cooks.
heat the oil and add turmeric and pour over soup.
the soup must be thick and runny. and serve hot or cold by garnishing.

gratinated chicken

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
gratinated chicken

sachert tart and apple crumble

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:

making your own alcohol at your home

Author: dharti shrestha // Category: , ,
type of yeast



Materials you need

yeast
Yeast
Sugar
Juice / water
Bottle/jug with tight cap




Yeast (which is actually produces the ethanol) ``there are many type of yeast, including those that are used specifically for making alcoholic beverage. It’s hard to fine in store. It is much easier and cheaper to just use active dry baker’s yeast if you are willing to sacrifice a bit quality.

Sugar
            Which the yeast will convert into alcohol, once it is activated.

You will also need some types of juice.(as ur choice..grape for wine and apple for cider)

Brewing process:

First and for most, you must make sure everything is sterile and squeaky clean to avoid bacterial denaturization.  If you bought a jug or gallon of water or juice, then it should already be sterile. Just be careful not to leave it exposed to the air for too long without the cap on.

Next, the sugar must be dissolved with juice or water. If you are not using juice...only making sugar wine, use more water and about 3 cups of sugar. And keep in bottle or jug leaving some space for yeast mixture.

After this, the yeast must be activated and added to the mixture, once it has cooled down to room temperature. You can see to packet of yeast...to follow the instruction on the packet to activate the yeast first.
If you don’t know how to do just add the yeast to a few tablespoons of warm water and a teaspoon of sugar and stir it until everything dissolves. Let it stir for about 10 minutes until it starts to forth up, then add it to the rest of the bottle/jug mixture. Make sure that the cap is screwed tight then shake it until everything is dissolved.

bubbles seen  due to reaction of yeast
Now, the balloon comes into play. Slightly unscrew the cap of the bottle/jug just enough to be able to let air out, and then pull the mouth of the balloon down over the cap and all. Then you will need to poke a tiny hole in the thickest part of balloon with needle. When the yeast begins to ferment the concoction, it will start to bubble up with CO2 gas, which needs a way to escape the bottle without exposing its contents to the air.




Fermentation process:

This is the waiting part. Store the bottle/jug in a dark place. If you don’t see bubbles rising up in the bottle/ jug by the end of second day, then it should be thrown out. It’s not in use. You should see a steady flow of carbonation rising into the balloon for at least 3 days. This can last up to 3 weeks before the alcohol content finally kills off all the yeast.
I recommend not letting it ferment for too long, however, since the yeast causes it to have a bad taste it it’s in there too long.
fermentation after 1 week
Once the bottle/jug stops bubbling and becomes clearer or if you would like to stop the fermentation process, leave the bottle/ jug in the fridge overnight to kill the rest of the yeast. After a night in fridge, the bottle/ jug should be clear, with a visible layer of dregs (dead yeast) at the bottom. To protect the flavor of your beverage, pour or siphon off the clear portion only in other clean container, leaving the dregs at the bottom. If you want to improve the quality even more, leave it in fridge another night or two, and repeat the process of separating the dregs from the mixture as many times as you want.
Now your drink is ready to drink if you like.

Another option is to keep it sealed (air tight) to let it age, which will give it better quality. You could even bottle your beverage and cork it to ensure it ages properly.

Planter’s Punch

Author: dharti shrestha // Category: ,
ingredients:
60 ml orange juice
15 ml lime juice
60 ml mango juice
30 ml dark rum (bacardi / khukhuri)

methods:
pour all the juices one by one.
top it with rum.
add one slice of orange inside and serve.

MangoDango

Author: dharti shrestha // Category: ,

ingredients:
mango dango
  • 60 ml mango juice
  • 60 ml orange juice
  • 15 ml fresh lime juice
  • 10 ml tomato juice 
  • 4-5 ice cubes
methods:
  • put all the ingredients except tomato juice  in shakes and shake well
  • top up it with tomato juice
  • garnish with orange slice and cherry and serve chilled.
(if u don't have shaker at your home just combine 2 glass and make yourself a shaker)

lemon mint

Author: dharti shrestha // Category: ,
ingredients:
lemon mint
  • 60 ml lemon juice
  • 8-10 pieces fresh mint leaves
  • 2-3 tbs sugar
  • 4-5 ice cubes
methods:
  • put all the ingredients in blender and blend. 
  • pour in to pilsner or high ball glass.
  • garnish with lemon slice and fresh mint leave and serve chilled.

(make the summer chill with lemon mint)

ginger beer

Author: dharti shrestha // Category: ,


its a home made version of ginger beer and its awesome and u can try its easy and good for summer...u will like it very muxh 

ingredient                                                    
ginger beer

• 140g/5oz fresh ginger
• 4 tablespoons  sugar
• 2 to 3 lemons
• 1 litre/1¾ pints soda water or sparkling mineral water
• sprigs of fresh mint

methods
  • First of all you need to grate your ginger on a coarse cheese grater – you can leave the skin on if you like.
  • Put the ginger with its pulpy juice into a bowl and sprinkle in your  sugar. Remove the rind from 2 of your lemons with a vegetable peeler, add to the bowl, and slightly bash and squash with something heavy like a pestle or a rolling-pin.
  • Just do this for 10 seconds, to mix up all the flavours.
  • Squeeze the juice from all 3 lemons and add most of it to the bowl.
  • Pour in your fizzy water or soda water.
  • Pass the ginger beer through a coarse sieve into a large jug and add lots of ice and some sprigs of mint.



for u baby

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
salami and tomato rose

heart

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
heart (red and normal cabbage)

crab from tomato

Author: dharti shrestha // Category:
crab tomato

flower on friuts

Author: dharti shrestha // Category: